A year on the Hill of Corton

Why was it not like this last year ?!

So shooting for the book is finished. But its harvest time again and I’m here shooting for other clients. Everyday seems to be a good day, with plenty of activity but appointments tend to get moved… I’m on the road around 7 a.m., just before dawn here to make the most of the morning light. I does not always work but here I’m never tempted to stay in bed !

Franck, the baker, with Gilles and Fred at Vival in Ladoix, the place for a coffee and the latest news

Franck, the baker, with Gilles and Fred at Vival in Ladoix, the place for a coffee and the latest news


SUNDAY was a glorious morning and after coffee in Ladoix and a lucky meeting with Mme Cornu which yielded an invitation to lunch with the harvesters, I headed off to visits in Puligny and Chassagne before coming back to check out the Côte de Nuits. I had several winemaker portraits to make and harvest is not the best time, but, if you working for a magazine they know, its just necessary to track them down…
Ballet in Champs-Gains

Ballet in Champs-Gains

Lining up in Musigny

Lining up in Musigny


Pascal Marchand is one of the dynamic breed which it can take good luck to locate, but this time not only was he only 10 minutes away from his Nuits base, but Murray Tawse his Canadian partner was there too. Both guys are very passionate about their business and easy to talk to.
Triage at Marchand-Tawse

Triage at Marchand-Tawse

A surprisingly successful end to a good day as we parted in Musigny.

MONDAY Vival at Ladoix, my usual breakfast coffee stop, was closed but I was off to Meursault so I headed for the Café/Tabac next to the church of St Nicolas in the centre. There have been some changes there this year, the fountain has been moved nearer to the Mairie and a lawn laid and trees planted. Plus a large metal fence….
I arrived to find that the car parking area outside the church that hosts the weekly market is now following the same process. This must be costing a bit !
And I have to say it is apparently not to everyone’s taste with its wall and wrought iron fence reaching up 3 metres…. Meursault is beginning to look like a tourist destination (if they can find pa parking place), not a working wine village. I guess we’ll learn to love it, but I can’t see the pickers being allowed to celebrate the end of their harvest by frolicking in the fountain.
In a break from work I call in to see Jacques and François Carillon at Puligny in their separate but neighbouring domaines.

Jacques Carillon in his cellar was in good spirits

Jacques Carillon in his cellar was in good spirits

Lunch with François Carillon and his cuverie team

Lunch with François Carillon and his cuverie team

Francois has the builders in for an expansion to his cellars but they are both thinking more about this year’s harvest and happy with quality, even if quantity is down again due to the storm in June. A less than promising August was followed by 2 good weeks of sun and a gentle north wind that has kept things healthy, even concentrated the juice.
Puligny has always cherished its tourists and provided an elegant atmosphere but I now see a couple of small art galleries too. I do wonder if the new “cabotte” bus shelter in Chassagne means they are following the trend…
Somehow I doubt it.
Another pickers lunch courtesy of chez François before getting back to work. That was all over by 4pm due to the necessity of meetings for my subject so on an increasingly hot afternoon my thoughts turned to the Grappe. Before I could get there I was stopped in my tracks by the Pavelot team unloading their beautiful baskets to attack a parcel of Corton beneath Pernand, an island of pinot amidst the Charlemagne.
Carrying 40k is hot work!

Carrying 40k is hot work!

I imagined these baskets were being used until they could no longer be maintained but I was told the domain has just bought 10 more from the Jura costing 100 euros each. Fully laden they weigh over 40 kilos! After chasing the porters up and down the slope I was even more ready for a beer.
But sadly La Grappe were sticking with there normal evening opening hour of 6pm so I paid a social call in Pernand before heading along the mud track through Charlemagne. Back on the tarmac I turned left at the cherry tree to take a look at what still might be happening above Aloxe and Corton. There below was Maurice Chapuis, easily recognised with his charabanc of a trailer for his pickers. I drove down to say hello just as they were finishing and whom should be doing triage but his brother Claude, the last man to write a book about Corton and who I very pleased to say has written the preface to “Une Anné en Corton” for us.
Claude(L) and Maurice Chapuis checking out the crop in Corton Clos du Roi

Claude(L) and Maurice Chapuis checking out the crop in Corton Clos du Roi


Maurice takes his pickers home.

Maurice takes his pickers home.


My next call, at the distillery in Ladoix was unsuccessful but as I headed back to Pernand with only a cold drink in mind I came across Serge the dedicated beekeeper who immediately invited me in for that beer!
There followed the sad story of his acacia flowering during a wet week in May which meant no honey as his bees would not come out. It seems one of his hives has mysteriously been vacated and his mortality rate is still steady at 20-25% a year, all bad news. No wonder he needed a bit of company. Still it was 7pm when I left, and a glorious evening so I did n’t take his concerns with me, this harvest is so much better than last year.

TUESDAY was another bright morning and after a coffee with Gilles and Fred at Vival,along with Franck the baker next door, I found Jean-Charles De La Morinère quietly smiling as their Charlemagne harvest started. He was constantly checking the rows to see that his pickers remembered his instructions on the first day of work, supervising the level of the grapes in each grey box and then helping to shift them to the trailer.

Jean-Charles de la Morinère likes what he sees in Charlemagne

Jean-Charles de la Morinère
likes what he sees in Charlemagne

Jean-Charles and Claude load the precious chardonnay

Jean-Charles and Claude load the precious chardonnay

All done with a smile that hid his great concentration on the job in hand. That was around 8 a.m. and as I saw that evening after the dinner with the pickers prepared by the 3 lady cuisine’s ( I called them Les Trois Gorieuses but they said they preferred LesTrois Graces !) that while we finished off our wine, Jean-Charles was still supervising in the cuverie, yet to eat.
The 3 Graces at the Bonneau du Martray kitchen door wait the pickers.

The 3 Graces at the Bonneau du Martray kitchen door wait the pickers.


Success with a great terroir requires such dedication all the year round.

The Pavelots were out again,this time in En Caradeux with one or two the porters enjoying an “Ice bucket challenge,

Cooling off on Caradaux

Cooling off on Caradaux

harvest style !
En Caradaux from Charlemagne

En Caradaux from Charlemagne

Pernand-Vergelesses seen from Caradaux

Pernand-Vergelesses seen from Caradaux

Great morning views of Pernand but sadly the Church roof is under repair for a while so I’m glad I already have that.
Off to lunch

Off to lunch

Lunch was enjoyed with some of the cuverie team from Latour in Aloxe before I set off for my afternoon in Vosne Romanée.
If you are unlucky at harvest time you might spend sometime avoiding the tractors and trailers, the vans and beaten up pickers’ Renaults as you circuit the village twice looking for a parking space. But its the same everywhere but usually the drivers (of the tractors and vans at least) are old hands who drive with patience, humour and courtesy. Perhaps its my hired Renault Kangoo that encourages them to think I am one of their own! Its the occasional peloton of cyclists, both the colourful lycra enthusiasts and the wobbling tourists that really cause me to curse; neither seeming to have a thought for what is going on around them, slicing through groups of pickers like saucisson.

Sadly a vineyard problem at my next visit meant my visit was postponed 24 hours, which turned well in the end so I was free to call in to see Louis-Michel Liger-Belair

Louis-Michel at the triage table

Louis-Michel at the triage table

to see and hear how it was all going before calling in to see Pierre Vincent at Domaine de la Vougeraie at Premeaux-Prissey.
Its biodynamic here and they prepare their treatments in a wonderfully atmospheric barn.
Vougeraie's drying barn

Vougeraie’s drying barn

Filling the press at Vougeraie

Filling the press at Vougeraie

Washing the press.

Washing the press.

WEDNESDAY dawned a a little grey but I was due to do some work for a producer in Buisson and a blanket of cloud evens out the shadows in the vineyard making the job easier.

Looking good in Ladoix-Serrigny

Looking good in Ladoix-Serrigny

Porter at Domaine Ravaut

Porter at Domaine Ravaut

Pierre Ravaut at work in Ladoix's Bois Roussot

Pierre Ravaut at work in Ladoix’s Bois Roussot

More Pinot Noir arriving.

More Pinot Noir arriving.

Time for cassecroute

Time for cassecroute

After starting at 7.30, by 9.30 you are ready for a break.

After starting at 7.30, by 9.30 you are ready for a break.


The afternoon is again very warm with better light and I picnic late watching the harvest in La Tâche from up on the road above.
Harvest in Vosne-Romanée's La Tâche.

Harvest in Vosne-Romanée’s La Tâche.

then spend it around Vosne before chasing off to see if three “micro-negociants” can give me a few minutes in the middle of there harvest for a few urgently requested pictures.
Jeremy Seysses, after a quick change of shirt!

Jeremy Seysses, after a quick change of shirt!

Mounir Saouma at Lucien Lemoine - the perfect host ! Its a welcome home brewed beer this time.

Mounir Saouma at Lucien Lemoine – the perfect host !
Its a welcome home brewed beer this time.

Nicolas Potel - always on the move, always smiling.

Nicolas Potel – always on the move, always smiling.

.
That’s it, a typically fluid day in Burgundy.

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One response

  1. Tilak Sinha

    Beautiful photographs, Jon !

    Autumn has arrived right on time with the equinox – a real chill in the air here this morning.

    Best regards

    Tilak

    Like

    September 23, 2014 at 8:01 am

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